Archive for August, 2009

Panamint Valley and Death Valley Part II

Posted in Panamint Valley and Death Valley: Spring 2009 Part II on August 7, 2009 by thedesertfiles

After climbing this steep hill we continued on our way.

Joe Grand


We found an old mine and decided to investigate.


Pics 111


Pics 113


We found the double toilets in back of the shack. I was more interested in the fact that the walls were pink.

Pics 118


Someone is going to get a few parking tickets….about 60 years worth.

Copy of Pics 130


Old rail cart tracks leading into the mine.

Copy of Pics 140


Into the darkness…

Copy of Pics 141


Copy of Pics 136


A little piece of Fontana history. The Marie Liabeuf Winery opened in Fontana in 1925. The original location has since been torn down. If you are on poplar street south of Valley Blvd. you are standing on an old winery.  A little piece of Fontana is in Death Valley.

Pics 138

Next week I will be driving to this site to find out if any evidence of the winery remains.


It was time to say good bye to the mine and drive into the bottom of Death Valley.


Pics 145


Looking down on the valley from high atop the mountain.



Pics 164


The Sand Dunes of Death Valley.


Pics 178

Copy of Pics 179


Pics 181


I was determined to make it to the top. An interesting fact about these dunes is that they make music. If you are lucky enough to be here you can hear them sing in the key of G.


me sand


The sun was setting and it was time to make camp for the night. I never made it to the top…but the next trip I will.


Copy of Pics 184


This would be our last day in Death Valley as all the camping spots were full from spring vacationers. I’d like to come back here next year and explore different areas of the Valley.


The Devils Cornfield.


Pics 185


The Devils Golf Course. Can you spot the gopher?


Pics 199


Pics 200


Mustard Canyon.


Pics 167



Painters Palette.

Pics 203


Natural Bridge. It is a very large bridge!

Copy (2) of Pics 166


The Cathedral.

Copy of Pics 196


The desert can be very unforgiving.

Pics 191


Looking for the elusive Death Valley Brown Trout.

Lookin 4 fish


As we crossed the border into Nevada we looked up at the hills and the ghosts of Death Valley bid farewell.


Copy of Pics 207






Advertisements

Panamint Valley and Death Valley

Posted in Panamint Valley and Death Valley: Spring 2009 Part I on August 6, 2009 by thedesertfiles

Panamint Valley and Death Valley are both located in California. Sweeping mountain views and the rugged desert landscape creates a state of mind that exists outside of the here and now. A different world awaits those who are lucky enough to come here.

I hope that on some distant day, not too far in the future, some of you will be able to drive the trails the I did and experience the beauty of this desert landscape.

We left Fontana California early on a dreary Monday morning. The drizzle was lite and the sun hung high above the clouds. The last trip we took was plauged with desert monsoons and vehicular technical issues. We hoped that this time nature would be more accomodating (as well as our rigs).

After we crested the Cajon Pass the sky opened up and the sun shone bright. We travelled at a brisk 70mph up highway 395. Unfortunatly we hit a swarm of butterflies. We had to pull over to clean the windshield!

Pics 175

After driving for two hours we passed the town of Trona and found our way to the ghost town of Ballerat.

Pics 083

Ballarat was founded in 1896 as a center of commerece for the many mining operations in Panamint Valley. Named after the Australian town of Ballarat, miners had been coming to the area for at least 50 years prior to its founding. The highest population Ballarat ever reached was 500 residents. Ballarat had seven saloons, a few hotels, a jail, and a school.

Can you imagine attending school here?

school

As the mines closed up operations Ballarat fell into decay. The ghost town now has a population of one. Mayor Rock Novak is judge, jury, and executionor of Ballarat. All kidding aside he is a very nice man. The Mayor is always ready to sit down for a chat.

RN

Ballarat now serves as a rally point for off roading expeditions in the Panamint range. We made our camp for the night by this grave yard.

Remind me to tell you about my ghost story!

Pics 078

Pics 081

There were 5 vehicles in all. This is our camp.

Pics 068

Beep Beep I’m a Jeep!

Pics 070

After setting up camp we headed to Barker Ranch. It was at this location that the Criminal Charles Manson was captured. The ranch is open to those can can get there. The furniture, pool, and vehicles he traveled in are still at the site. Unfortunately it was burned to the ground a month after we made our visit.

On the way up the trail…

Pics 059

A lone cabin along the trail…

Pics 058

We made a wrong turn and had to figure out how to back up!

Pics 008

The reason I always carry a snake bite kit. If you see a rattle snake in the wild leave it alone. It is just as afraid of you as you are of it. We had to stop to let him pass.

Pics 011



We finally arrived at Barker Ranch. Being here gave me a sense of uneasyness. As if ghosts of the past were watching us.

BRANCH


Where it all happened…

Pics 012


Pics 019


Charles Manson sat in this very chair…

Pics 021


…and so did we…

Pics 029


One last look inside!


Pics 037


Time to pack up and head back to camp for the night. Carne Asada Tacos  and grilled chicken awaited us.


Pics 057


On the way back to camp I decided it would be a good idea to taste the salt on the dry lake bed.


Pics 062


“Panamint” Paul keeping warm by the camp fire.


Pics 073


The next morning we traveled the Fish Canyon Escape Trail. In 1849, William Manly led a group of travelers across Death Valley in search of riches. The group eventually became lost in Death Valley and wondered the desert floor for months. By the time the group escaped Death Valley via Fish Canyon only a handful of people survived. This is a portion of the route they took to escape.


Pics 095


Pics 103


Way up high on the ridge.

Pics 102


MR D


By the time lunch rolled around we had finished the trail. We aired up and said our goodbyes to the rest of the group. I continued on to Death Valley by myself.

Pics 105


Pics 109


We set out on our own to discover Death Valley. We headed north on the old Trona Wildrose Road.

Please  read part II of our Death Valley Trip